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.s. ambassador to iraq. if confirmed, i will deepen our collaboration with iraq and its people and secure our vital interests. i look forward to collaborate with you and your staff and encourage you to visit iraq to see the important work we're doing there. thank you for the opportunity to testify today. i welcome your questions. >> thanks very much. can you share with me in answer to the question i raised about the iranians using iraqi airspace in order to support assad? what have we been doing -- what have you been doing, if anything, to limit that use? >> i have personally engaged in this repeatedly at the highest levels of the iraqi government. my colleagues in baghdad have engaged in this and every single visitor representing u.s. government from the center -- three cell -- 3 visitors have raised it with the iraqis to make it clear we find this unacceptable and we find it not helpful and detrimental to the region and to iraq and of course to the syrian people. this is something that needs to stop and we are pressing and will continue to press until the bus stop. >> it may stop when it is
today, they are flying airplanes over iraq into syria to help one of their allies. you mention that everyone at every level has talked to al- maliki about that and you will continue. what is his response when you say you would like him to cooperate with us in our interests? what does he exactly say in response to our efforts? >> the response is typically to express concern about the events in syria. they are very clear that both the prime minister and other iraqi officials have no interest in saying the current government continue, that they are no friends of that regime, that regime has been hostile to them in the past and allow terrorists to come into iraq and been harmful to democracy and institutions and the people in iraq. they are interested in seeing that there is a clear outcome in syria that protects their interests. there have been a little trouble seeing that. >> what about the aerospace issue? why are they continuing to cooperate with iran and that effort? what can they tell you specifically regarding that? what is their response? >> they say engage in all parties a
nominated by president obama to be our ambassador to iraq. and i think all of us on the committee are pleased the president has nominated somebody of high caliber, great experience, who is our defense server vanessa the deputy chief of mission in baghdad for the year and previously served as ambassador to jordan and executive assistant to secretary of state, colin powell and condoleezza rice. while america's war has ended in iraq, the struggle for iraq's future obviously has not ended. the violence is down, but al qaeda and iraq remains a very deadly foe and iraq may not capture the jays today headlined. then no one should make the mistake to somehow come to a conclusion that iraq doesn't present extraordinary challenges. this administration has worked tirelessly to ensure that it doesn't become a forgotten front. we put in place a road mac on a browser to have issues. political, economic, educational, scientific and military. our bilateral partnership has potential to contribute, we believe to the stability in the middle east. but iraqi leaders have to decide for themselves what
from iraq and afghanistan and they can't find work. and and so we come out of the recession and the recovery way a higher percent of unemployment and especially veterans under age 24 have an even higher percentage of unemployed, and so what we have here is a piece of legislation to give an unemployment cushion for veterans for at least a year until they can find employment in the private sector, and this is employment to do things that we need since so many of our national resources such as parks, such as emergency responders, such as firefighters, such as police need help. look at all the unfunded things that are deteriorating in the national parks. this would be an opportunity to employ those veterans and employ them up to a year. everybody knows that this makes common sense and it's the right thing to do, and what's happening is the folks on that side of the aisle because we are in an election and because this happened to be a proposal coming out of the white house and is brought to the floor by this senator from florida, they're not going to support it and they're going
gay. authorities in iraq are behind the systematic persecution of homosexuals, and capturing the world in color a century after usmovies broke out in black and white, the first films are being discovered. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. no american ambassador has been killed in the line of duty since 1979, but today the flags haveeen put at half mast in honor of chris stevens. the u.s. ambassador and three other diplomats were killed in the raid. the white house is investigating whether the attacks were planned, and president obama has promised to bring the killers to justice. >> in the darkness and confusion, witnesses said the area was cordoned off by heavily armed men. the attack was linked with an american film the attackers then insulting the prophet mohammed. >> we have to stop this. stopping the film is our hope. >> by the morning the u.s. consulate in bengasi was in ruins, but this was not the first attack. in june the convoy was hit. no one was killed, and the un has also been targeted. the u.s. ambassador christopher stephens started his time as
handed down to iraq's sunni vice president, tariq al-hashimi, as fears there rise of spreading sectarian violence. >> brown: special correspondent john tulenko reports on a community college program that has turned wine into jobs in washington state. >> i wanted to tch them how to make good wine. we got the medals. wow, we did it. it's happening. >> woodruff: making a tough call in the heat of a pennant race. we'll talk about why the washington nationals have benched ace pitcher stephen strasburg. >> brown: and lessons in tv reporting, as therapy for kids with asperger's syndrome. >> my favorite part about action 7 is getting to do what all the others get to do and letting your friends and be you. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences, tailored to individual consumer preferences. igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out, sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railwa
it was an apt quote. >> host: how many women served in the iraq war? >> guest: over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. >> host: americans? >> guest: yeah. >> host: is that unusual? >> guest: yes. the iraq war in particular set a precedent historically. more women served, were wounded, and killed in the iraq war by around 2005 into the war already than all the wars all poult to the. one in ten troops was a woman. >> host: because of the nature of the war -- >> guest: basically a guerrilla war, there's not any front line. drawing a line in the sand, and the enemy side should meet up and fight. that doesn't happen anymore. battles take place, end roads, hospitals, and even if you drive a truck full of toilet paper you can be attacked. because there's no front line, even if you're combat support or you're an engineer or a cook, you can get drawn into battle, and many, many women also were used as gunners working alongside with the infantry doing the same jobs as the infantry because of the shortage of troops. >> host: women are not supposed to serve in combat, are they? >> guest: right. o
production in the persian gulf. focusing mostly iraq. they speak about tensions between saudi arabia and iran. -- for the fall semester. and i would just mention in the way of an advertisement that we will be having our next program on october 23. it will be on jordan. jordan, i think it put a title out there of -- in the cross hairs again. we are fortunate to have the vice-president for studies at carnegie endowment for national peace. and a very good personal friend who will be coming as well as dr. kurt ryan, an associate of the latin .ppellati tonight as we gather, i always express my appreciation to the exxon mobil corp., which is a donor. it gives us substantial contributions each year to put on these programs, pay for expenses. and bring some of these guests from out-of-town. i think of them. tonight, we are going to focus on oil and politics in the persian gulf. and really focus on the prominence of this area and the energy market. the persian gulf area as 60% of the world's proven oil reserves. and 40% of the world's proven gas reserves. in fact, six of the top 40 in the countries in
as secretary general. it was iraq. it was a contentious issue. you spend a lot of time writing about this in the book and you reintegrate your thoughts that it was not a legitimate war. you write, it's 9/11 changed the world, the consequences of the iraq war were the similarly dramatic magnitude. why do you say that >> guest: i say that because the iraq war really left with the international community and i'm not just talking about the u.n. i'm talking about the impact on communities and groups in the middle east. and beyond. and the sense that the world has been broken in to groups and some were being targeted or profiles who felt very strongly about this, and this is about a war on which they the international community was divided. not approve it and i've personally believed we should have give the inspectors the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iraq and come back with a report to the security counsel but the counsel had that won saddam hussein, that if you do not [inaudible] there would be serious consequences to determine the firstly whether he has performed with
invest 800 but with the nephew have real capital. . . and that's iraq. it was a very contentious issue and do spend a lot of time writing about it in the book and you reiterate your thoughts that it was not a legitimate war. you write, it if 9/11 change the world the consequences that the iraq war were similarly dramatic magnitude. why did you say that? >> guest: i say that because the iraq war led to major divisions within the international communities and i'm not just talking about the u.n.. i'm talking about its impact on communities and groups in the middle east and beyond and a sense that the world has been broken into groups and some were being targeted or profiled who felt very strongly about this and this is about a bar on which the international committee was divided. the council did not approve it and i firmly believe we should have given the inspectors, the weapons inspectors, more time to do their work in iraq and gotten back with a report to the security council but the council that heads wanted so dam -- saddam said there would be serious consequences to determine first w
quote. >> how many women served in the iraq war? >> about 200,000 -- over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. >> americans. >> is that unusual? >> yes. the iraq war in particular set a precedent. more women have served and been wounded and killed in the iraq war by about 2005 to get into the war already. all americans for together since world war ii, including afghanistan. so it was a huge, huge difference. one in every 10 troops was women. >> did they serve different capacities in the past quite >> yes, because of the nature of the war, the nature of all boys these days, there isn't any front-line narrow fashion sense, drawing a line in the sand for having an area where the soldiers from the enemy said the meet up in sight. that just doesn't happen anymore. battles take place in roads and hospitals would even if you're driving on the chart with toilet paper, you can be attacked. so because there's no front line, even if you're a combat engineer or a cook, you can get drawn into battle and many, many women also been used working alongside indian country doing exactly the same
the challenges iraq faces after the country has yet to finalize a law dictating the use of oil profits. tension continues to rise over the oil rights in the government of baghdad and the kurdish region. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you for the policy event of the fall semester and i would just mention in the way that advertisement we will be having our next program on october 23rd and we will get a notice but it will be on jordan. i think i put a title belt there in the crosshairs and we are very fortunate to have dr. washer who is the vice president for studies of the carnegie endowment for the national peace, for our foreign minister of jordan and a free good personal friend who will be coming as well as dr. kurt ryan who is this a sea of political science at appalachian state university and a scholar and person who's written a lot about jordan. so that should be very interesting forum. but tonight, as we gather i always express my appreciation to the exxonmobil corporation which is a founder and a dillinger and gives us a substantial contribution each year to be able to put on
thoughts it was not a legitimate war. you say if 9/11 change the world, the iraq war is similar magnitude. why do you say that? >> guest: i say that because the iraq war really led to major divisions within the international community, and i'm not just talking about the u.n. i'm talking about the impact on communities and groups in the middle east and beyond the, and the sense the world has been broken into groups, and some are being targeted or profiled, who felt very strongly about it, and this is about a war on which the international community was divided. -- it was not approved, and personally believed we should have given the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iran and come back with a report to the security council, for the council that warned saddam, if you do not perform there will be serious consequences, to determine, firstly, whether he has performed cooperatively with inspectors or not and secondly, determined what those consequences should be. obviously when it comes to use of force, any country, when attacked, has the right to defend itself. but when it comes
traveled to iraq to become suicide bombers. the highest number from any town outside of iraq. >> the city and its surroundings were sympathetic to these groups because they had a common enemy which was kadafi. >> from the onset of the revolution, it was the extremists that provided security. after liberation was announced, there was increasing pressure on kald in yemen and other places. alleged to have been sent here by al qaeda's leader. according to security sources, these militia have a common goal weakening and infiltrating libya's security apparatus. in benghazi there have been more than a dozen assassinations of former military officers. sources tell cnn that many of them were reportedly on a islamist hit list to eliminate qualified individuals that could pose a threat. kernel from the lyan army was recently kidnapped. he doesn't know by whom or exactly why. he got a call from a man who spoke as if he knew him and said he had urgent information to pass on. outside his home, in broad daylight, two masked man forced him into their car. when i got into the car, they put a black hood on
international. i'm suzanne malveaux. here's what's going on right now. the government of iraq wants its own vice president dead. well, now he is on the run. and in syria they called them barrel bombs. they are filled with nails, gasoline, and tnt. one just fell on a kindergartener. also, we begin in europe where a little while ago a girl just woke up after witnessing the unspeakable. it is a murder mystery that stretches from france to britain. a family was found dead in a car in the french alps. the body 6 a cyclist was also discovered meesh. all the victims were shot in the head. twice. but two little girls survived. one was beaten and shot. the other one hid under her dead mother's legs for hours. we are joined from england outside the family's home, and antika, this has a lot of people talking. i mean, it's unbelievable when you think about what took place, what happened with this family. do investigators have any idea of a motive? >> not at this point, and that's the big question. what was the motive? why did this happen? this is why british police are now inside the family home behind me t
think that troops should be sent back into iraq? >> i absolutely do not think we need to send troops back to iraq. we have done our job in iraq in the military sense. i mean engagement diplomatically and engagement with the people of iraq. iraq has very troublesome neighbors. a successful iraq has the potential to change the face of the middle east. our engagement should be deep, but it should be political, diplomatic and social and economic. >> belva: how do you think the rise of china will or does have an effect on the health of california? >> the rise of china as an economic power is one of the major stories of the late 20th and 21st century. i was in china in 1988 in beijing. the streets of beijing were a competition between a few horse carts and automobiles and a lot of bicycles. that is not the china of today. it has been an economic miracle. china, it can be an economic miracle which is good for the international economy. we should be able to have the chinese have freer trade to have exports into china. we need robust chinese economic growth to fuel the international economy.
from the iraq war and three from the battle of whether barack obama is a legitimate president. plus "scoops and predictions" right from the notebooks of these top reporters. be right back. >> "the chris matthews show" is brought to you by hotels.com, chris: welcome back. it's our 10th anniversary and we're celebrating with reminders of iconic moments of these past 10 years. we started this show in the fall of 2002, the invasion of iraq was getting close and two iconic scenes from iraq make our top 10 list of in your face moments during the last 10 years. first, president george w bush confronted by an iraqi journalist. he threw two of the shoes and bush missed both. good for him. the defense secretary in a much more serious moment, donald rumsfeld on a 2004 christmas visit over there to iraq. in just the previous four weeks from then, 26 american troops had been killed by roadside bombs destroying their vehicles and one soldier stood up and faced off against defense secretary rumsfeld. >> why do we soldiers have to dig through local landfills for pieces of scrap medal and compromise
to extradite iraq that if you did to rise president after he was sentenced to death in a set -- in absentia. the turkish prime minister said hashimi can stay in turkey as long as he wants to. james reynolds has this. >> tariq al hashimi is meant to be on death row in baghdad, but instead we met him at a hotel in turkey. iraq that the vice-president dismissed the iraqi court that a verdict. >> the verdict was not -- from -- was not a surprise to me. i thought this verdict to be taken by this unreliable trial. >> this is the man he blames for the verdict, iraq that the prime minister, north al-maliki. the two men lead iraq that a rival communities of sunnis and shias. iraq's vice president said he was prepared to go back to iraq under two conditions. >> i am ready any time, provided that security is prepared for me. and fair trial. >> does it mean the trial without the government of north al-maliki? >> the problem we are facing, james -- the case of the accusation. let us talk about how to put an end or how to find a suitable exit for the current political impasse we are facing. >> the presen
with boost. >>. >>> he said it was a mistake to end the war in iraq and bring all of our warriors home. he said it was a mistake that set a mandate for our warriors in afghanistan and bring them home. he i will plied by his speech he is ready to go to war in syria and iran. >> paul: that was vice president joe biden at a campaign stop in pennsylvania suggesting that mitt romney is ready to go to war in iran and syria. it's the theme they are pushing with the president himself getting in on the act. in an interview on 60 minutes. mr. robe responding to criticism said, quote, if governor romney is suggesting we should start another war, he should say so. so rumors of war, dan. what the political strategy here or do you think there is one? >> obviously we are in a moment when everything barack obama says is related to his reelection. so it is with this. a key element of the obama reelection strategy has to do with perceived voter fatigue over wars, iraq and afghanistan. >> paul: tide of war are receding? >> exactly. first thing he said i ended the war in iraq. how he is binding down afghanist
that it was not a legitimate war. that 9/11 changed the world from the consequences of the iraq war were similarly dramatic in magnitude. when you say that? >> guest: the iraq war rarely mentioned interaction with the community. i'm not just talking about the u.n. communities and groups in the middle east. and also beyond. the things that the world has been broken into groups, or some are being targeted or profiled, felt very who felt very strongly about this. this is about more on which the committee was divided. the council did not approve it. some believe we should been giving the inspectors the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iraq and come back to the council, that if you do not perform, there would be serious consequences. to determine what those consequences should be. obviously, when it comes to use of force, any country one attack has a right to defend itself. but when it comes to broader peace and security issues, one cannot do it without the unique legitimacy of the figurative narration. >> host: is not a war that is still interested, although it is extreme terrorism, as it is ev
. bin laden's trying to take our eye off of the real threat, iraq. >> because they're obsessed. they got to go to iraq! that's what they came to do, start a war with iraq. who cares who's actually going to be a threat to us? look, the c.i.a. had to do a briefing. >> what kind of morons are you? it's not iraq! how stupid are you? it's not iraq! it's bin laden and he's coming. look at this: may one 2001, this is just a partial list, july 29, july 9, july 11 july 24 and the famous one on august 6, they're coming, they're coming, do something do something! you loser you failure. do something! he didn't do anything. that's why he had the stupid look on his face when we got hit reading to the kids, oh, my god they hit us. they weren't just covering their ass. they ignored the intelligence because they had none! >> after the attacks condoleezza rice said: >> this is during the 9/11 commission hearings: >> he made clear to me, that is bush, that he did not want to respond top al-qaeda one attack at a time. he told me he was tired of swatting flies. after 9/11, they call it swatting flies. some o
it was a very apt. >> host: company women served in the iraq war? >> guest: over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. americans. >> host: is that unusual? >> guest: yes, the iraq war in particular. more women had served in the iraq war by around 2005, two years into the war already, then all the american wars put together, including afghanistan. one in every 10 troops in iraq was a woman. >> host: they serve in different capacities and in the past? >> guest: yes, because it was a guerrilla war, drawing a line in the sand, having an errol where they are our soldiers from enemy side, that is a battle that takes place in roads and hospitals and trucks and toilet paper, it they are used for attacks. it because there is no front line, even if you are an engineer or a cook, many women were being used as gunners and doing the same jobs because of the shortage of troops. >> host: but women are not supposed to serve in combat, right? >> guest: yes, that's right. on the ground, in reality, when you have combat in iraq afghanistan for two years. >> host: was very typical experience for american
for bringing to bear some of the numbers, some of the horrific things that are happening in iraq right now. this poem was drawn from my experiences in iraq from the culture, from the music and from its traditions. so i have dedicated this poem to iraq. i think it will be helpful for you to know el kubenchi, along with el watanabi. el kubenchi is famous for music, a great history and tradition of music, and he has taught all the gray modern singers of the 20th century who came out of iraq. his music has touched me and you will hear it in this poem, 32 beads on a string. i woke from the nightmare of a gutted macom, not because i have not yet bled my life in yellow, but because minarettes looking sky ward. one burly buffalo looking for hooves and hot breath because the skin is not yet numb and the lights are not yet flickering, i will continue to sip at my hot tea and stare at the dust-colored noon. one white dasha screams with the brilliance of red. can you hear them, the melodious intent, the glimmering mood in their eyes. face stitched by seam, a garment i have sewn to my skin. whatever re
long war we launched after 9/11 has been ended in iraq. and all of those variables factor into decisions about how we mark this day as americans. but also how our leaders or our would be leaders mark it. how we commemorate 9/11 is a work in progress. we saw today a decision by the white house and the obama campaign to have vice president joe biden mark the day in a way that was not political. it was just about remembering the people who were lost that day and commemorating the sacrifices people have made in this country because of 9/11. while both sides in the presidential campaign suspended their negative ads for the day out of respect for the anniversary, there's no ban on campaigning today. there's no rule about what you can and cannot do. mitt romney gave a speech today before the national guard association in reno, nevada, and at times it sounded like his normal stump speech. he did go out of his way to attack president obama for defense cuts that are part of the sequester deal. which incidentally, are cuts that paul ryan voted for in congress. that's the kind of thin
and their family. ft. bliss is the site where the president announced the end of the iraq war two years ago. this is just over 35 minutes. >> hello, cleveland. what up! thank you so much, everybody! thanks for the introduction and your leadership. leading our troops in iraq and taking care of our soldiers now that they are at home. and right at the top, let me say that our hearts are obviously with all of the folks that were down in louisiana and the gulf coast dealing with the aftermath of hurricane isaac, our prayers are with those who have lost loved ones and i've directed the federal government to keep doing everything that it can to help our partners at the state and local level. as a country, we stand united with our fellow americans in the hour of need. i want to thank your general and the great commanders welcoming me here today. i want to give a shout out to the sergeant major of the army, ray chandler. command sergeant major robert kelly. it reminds me that the noncommissioned officers are the backbone of our military, leading the finest in the world. it is great to be back at ft.
revenge in the mountains and deserts of iraq and afghanistan. because a transformative moment for me, was imbedded with the first battalion of the fifth marines, in kuwait in march 2004, and we were making an overland journey of several hundred miles to fallujah, and fallujah was not yet in the news. the battle was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah, and all we did was transport one marine battalion from one place to another. no fighting in between. wasn't particularly dangerous. but the logistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water bottles. a tool kit. meals ready to eat. it was just an immense logistical exercise to get men and women and materiale from northern kuwait to fallujah without any fighting, and there you saw how distance mattered. how you just couldn't defeat distance through the latest technology. >> i think it might be interesting for the audience if you'd personalize the story of iraq a little bit, and talk about your own views. this is a place you knew, that you traveled in, in the 1980s and the time of saddam hussein. you were a s
's foreign policy got us out of iraq, is getting us out of afghanistan, has killed osama bin laden, and has said in the future we are going to target our enemies. we are not going to do five or 10-year occupation of foreign countries. >> bad things that happen overseas happen to preside. they do not happen to other candidates. i don't really see that mitt romney is able to do that. what is he going to do? have troops on the ground in lots of these places? the american people do not want that right now. >> what do you do if there is a revolution in iran next time? in israel, you are now going to distance yourself from the elected prime minister and it shows that you want to create gratuitously distance between you and israel as a way to gain favor on the arab side. >> we cannot turn over our foreign policy initiative to the current prime minister of israel. the united states must keep israel out as our most important ally in the middle east to save time doing what is right for the united states'. >> the polls show that people did not like the way he responded, the way he jumped into the midd
about the future of the marine corps. >> you commanded troops in iraq and afghanistan. what are the three enduring lessons that marines will have to take with them well into the future about irregular warfare and counterinsurgency. >> i believe we learned a couple of things coming out of afghanistan and iraq. the need for the cultural awareness piece of any place we go, we have to know the battle space, know our allies, know our enemy better than we have in the past perhaps. we need to carry that forward with us. we'll remember that i think we're also going to remember the fact we need to be adaptable. you need to be flexible both in our tactics, our procedures and our act to get the -- and our ability to get the equipment our soldiers need as warfare changes and the enemy adapts to our methods and our procedures. lastly i think of course is protection against very simple weapons produced but very effective weapons produced against us at we have to adapt ourselves to very quickly. >> it's written that the marines should dedicate 30,000 of its force on regular warfare and 70,
in iraq, where 76 people were killed and almost 100 injured in a series of attacks. it was the latest effort attacks. the deadliest was just north of baghdad where three car bombs exploded within minutes of each other. eight people died there, and 28 were injured. >>> and there were more protests today about the anti-muslim film made in america. while in indonesia, thousands more protested in front of the u.s. embassy in jakarta. back in the u.s. just three days now until the first presidential debate with the candidate spending the next few days intensely preparing for wednesday's showdown. kristen welker is traveling with the president in las vegas. >> reporter: with four mock debates under his belt, the president will rally in nevada before jumping into the ring with his sparg partner mitt romney. president obama got another boost, leading governor romney by four points, 49% to 45%. >> i want to see us export more jobs, export more products -- excuse me. i was -- i was channeling my opponent there for a second. >> reporter: last week romney hinting at his debate approach. >> he's t
.m. >> brian castner, a bronze star recipient who completed two tours of duty in iraq as a commander of an explosive disposal unit, talks about the impact of the war upon his return. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thanks to everybody for coming. um, this is quite a crowd. we've got standing room only, and that's a wonderful thing. just want to take a second to acknowledge my wife is here, jesse, i dedicated the book to her, and my folks are here, and lots of friendly faces in the audience from various communities in buffalo, so i appreciate that. thank you all for coming. what i'd hoped to do was talk a little bit, first, about the book, then do a reading, a short reading. i, i recorded the audio book. i was lucky enough to do that. so if you really want to hear my voice do the whole thing, you can do that. so i'll do kind of a short section, and then we'll do some question and answer at the end, if that works. where i wanted to start was talking about a trip that i made in may. the first weekend in may every year is the eod memorial down in florida. and eod can,
? yes. ok - that's fine. >> i served in iraq recently and and i would be curious as to whether the report gives attention to the work we have done in iraq. there were a number of projects that n.e.d. was involved in in iraq and the republican institute assisting the iraqis preparing for elections. i was working at the provincial reconstruction team level. we have voter education as one project. we instructed iraqi schoolchildren on the concept of human rights and the role of the elections in a democratic society for grades 1-12. we were doing work in this area. iraqis complained that some of our efforts in public health was not being sufficiently publicized to the iraqi public. >> we did not really deal too much with the situation in iraq. we were looking at it from a more global point of view. many of the things you're talking about are the kinds of projects that would come under this strategy now. iraq was a different situation. we were there at large numbers with large forces and could operate in a more direct way than we could generally speaking. >> also, i don't want in a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 2,703 (some duplicates have been removed)

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